Frequently Asked Questions

Electrical surges can be caused by anything from lightning strikes, damage to power lines, faulty appliances and bad electrical wiring in the house. While an actual surge only lasts a microsecond, frequent surges can damage the electrical components connected to your home, degrading their life expectancy significantly.

An electrician is any skilled tradesperson who designs, installs, maintains, and repairs the electrical systems and products used in residential homes, businesses, and factories. Electricians work inside or outside buildings to ensure lights, industrial equipment, and appliances operate safely and reliably.

The maintenance and repairing of the electrical appliances are crucial for avoiding any disturbance or obstacle during work routine and also to prevent oneself and assets from any catastrophe.

How to identify electrical faults Switch off the main power at the consumer unit/fuse box. Or switch off the breaker and lock it if you can. Attach a note to the unit to advise you are working on the circuit. Check the circuit is dead with a socket tester or voltage tester/meter for lighting circuits.

You can expect to pay $8,000 to $15,000 to rewire a 1,500- to 3,000-square-foot home. The precise cost will depend on the size and age of your house, the ease with which an electrician can access old wiring, and the quirks that abound in older homes.

Electrical maintenance covers all aspects of testing, monitoring, fixing, and replacing elements of an electrical system. Usually performed by a licensed professional with a complete knowledge of the National Electric Code and local regulations, electrical maintenance covers areas as diverse as: Digital communication.

Always keep them clean and well-maintained, clean them after every use, make adjustments or repairs when necessary to keep them functioning optimally, and be sure to store them properly.

Well usually when "half" of something dies in residential electrical, it means one hot leg is down. This could be an issue at the transformer, the wiring to your meter, the meter itself, the wiring from the meter to your main panel, the main breaker or a fault within your panel.

A damaged circuit breaker is one of the notorious causes of a partial power outage in many homes. The damage is commonplace during an overloaded electrical circuit or a short-circuiting from a faulty appliance or wiring. Diagnosing the problem isn't difficult since a blown fuse or a discolored switch is enough clue.

Electricity allows us to power the technology we use every day. If you plan on trying to live without electricity, you will no longer be able to turn on the central heating in your home, use the toilet, preserve food in your fridge/freezer or have clean running water.

Remove the fuse from its holder. In some cases you may need a small screwdriver to unscrew the fuse holder cap. Look at the fuse wire. If there is a visible gap in the wire or a dark or metallic smear inside the glass then the fuse is blown and needs to be replaced.

The culprit could be a dying battery, loose wires, or a malfunctioning alternator belt. Corrosion of electrical systems may also be an issue. Unless you have a voltmeter handy (and know how to use it) you probably won't be able to diagnose the issue yourself.

If your outlet has short circuited or been overloaded, then your circuit breaker may have shut off its power. Check other nearby outlets to see if they are working. If they also are dead, then go to your circuit breaker. When a circuit breaker has tripped, the lever will usually flip to the middle or off position.

Faulty wiring shows some noticeable signs. For example, dimming or flickering lights are signs of faulty wiring. Plus, if you experience frequent blown breakers or fuses, there's a good chance that faulty wiring may be to blame. Other common symptoms of faulty wiring include charred or darkened outlets and switches.

Overloaded circuit warning signs: Flickering, blinking, or dimming lights. Frequently tripped circuit breakers or blown fuses. Warm or discolored wall plates. Cracking, sizzling, or buzzing from receptacles. Burning odor coming from receptacles or wall switches. Mild shock or tingle from appliances, receptacles, or switches.

To do that, you need the help of an electrician. When it comes to replacing the outlet, the procedure is pretty simple. Remove them and attach them to the same place on the new outlet. Turn the breaker on to test the outlet and, if it works, turn the breaker off and secure the outlet back into the wall.

The average cost to replace a fuse box with a breaker panel is $1,100 to $4,000 and depends on what capacity the new breaker panel can handle. There are a few reasons for a new breaker box installation over a fuse box.

Although most homeowners policies cover electrical wiring through dwelling insurance, there are cases where coverage may not apply. When homes have old electrical wiring types like knob and tube or aluminum wiring, insurance companies may deny coverage.

Turn off all wall switches, and unplug every lamp and appliance on the dead circuit. Then reset the tripped breaker or install a new fuse as discussed above. If the circuit goes dead right away, the problem could be a short circuit in a receptacle or switch.